The Charleston Museum

Feb 24

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Feb 18

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Feb 12

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Feb 10

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Feb 05

Shenkl shellAllegheny Arsenal (attributed)Pittsburgh, PA1860-65
Named for its developer, John P. Shenkl, and used primarily as a naval projectile, Schenkl shells were loaded with a papier-mâché cylinder enclosing the shell’s rear conical section. This covering provided a tighter fit inside the canon’s barrel. Once fired, this cylinder disintegrated leaving the shell with a more streamlined, oval shape, allowing for increased distance and accuracy. The rounded nose pattern of this particular shell indicates it was of “case shot” design, the forward section holding small-caliber musket balls that would scatter radially upon detonation. 
Numerous Shenkl shells of varying calibers are still found around Charleston, most of which appear to have been fired by Admiral John A. Dahlgren’s naval gunships during the Siege of Charleston 1863-1865. 
Weaponry Wednesday: Each Wednesday we post an object (or group of objects) from the Charleston Museum’s diverse weapons collection. Many Weaponry Wednesday items may be on permanent exhibit in our armory or elsewhere in the museum, but some pieces rarely see exhibition, temporary or permanent, but are well worth sharing.  We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on WEAPONRY WEDNESDAY! Also, we always want to learn more about our collection - if you have some insights on a piece, please feel free to share!  #WeaponryWednes

Shenkl shell
Allegheny Arsenal (attributed)
Pittsburgh, PA
1860-65

Named for its developer, John P. Shenkl, and used primarily as a naval projectile, Schenkl shells were loaded with a papier-mâché cylinder enclosing the shell’s rear conical section. This covering provided a tighter fit inside the canon’s barrel. Once fired, this cylinder disintegrated leaving the shell with a more streamlined, oval shape, allowing for increased distance and accuracy. The rounded nose pattern of this particular shell indicates it was of “case shot” design, the forward section holding small-caliber musket balls that would scatter radially upon detonation. 

Numerous Shenkl shells of varying calibers are still found around Charleston, most of which appear to have been fired by Admiral John A. Dahlgren’s naval gunships during the Siege of Charleston 1863-1865. 

Weaponry Wednesday: Each Wednesday we post an object (or group of objects) from the Charleston Museum’s diverse weapons collection. Many Weaponry Wednesday items may be on permanent exhibit in our armory or elsewhere in the museum, but some pieces rarely see exhibition, temporary or permanent, but are well worth sharing.  We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on WEAPONRY WEDNESDAY! Also, we always want to learn more about our collection - if you have some insights on a piece, please feel free to share!  #WeaponryWednes

Feb 04

This stylish early 20th century purse or handbag is luscious red velvet with red leather side and bottom gussets. The front scalloped pocket is ornamented with red leather pointed ovals studded with steel beads. The bag has a steel frame with knob clasp and the red velvet handle attaches to the frame with steel fittings shaped like hands grasping the frame. Elegant but also practical, it is lined with tan cotton.
The purse came to the Museum in 2007 from the granddaughter of Eulalie Northrop Wall, Marion, S.C. It was found in a trunk of her things, including her wedding dress from 1912. Helen Eulalie Northrop was born in Idaho in 1891 but married John Furman Wall, a Marion, S.C. native. His military service took him around the globe during and after World War I. She died in 1964 and they are both buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
Perhaps this wonderful purse dates to around the time of her marriage.
See this purse and many more in our exhibit Fashion Accessories: Purses!
TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from the Charleston Museum’s textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

This stylish early 20th century purse or handbag is luscious red velvet with red leather side and bottom gussets. The front scalloped pocket is ornamented with red leather pointed ovals studded with steel beads. The bag has a steel frame with knob clasp and the red velvet handle attaches to the frame with steel fittings shaped like hands grasping the frame. Elegant but also practical, it is lined with tan cotton.

The purse came to the Museum in 2007 from the granddaughter of Eulalie Northrop Wall, Marion, S.C. It was found in a trunk of her things, including her wedding dress from 1912. Helen Eulalie Northrop was born in Idaho in 1891 but married John Furman Wall, a Marion, S.C. native. His military service took him around the globe during and after World War I. She died in 1964 and they are both buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Perhaps this wonderful purse dates to around the time of her marriage.

See this purse and many more in our exhibit Fashion Accessories: Purses!

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from the Charleston Museum’s textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

Jan 29

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Jan 27

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Jan 21

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