The exhibition, Hexagon – eternal piece, part of the Tokyo International Great Quilt Festival 2012, contains four quilts from the Museum’s collection. On display form January 20 though January 28, these quilts will be seen by thousands of visitors from around the world.
This paper-template pieced quilt top was made by Elizabeth Docton Perry (born c. 1742) , wife of Ezekial Perry of Ridge Spring, SC probably in the early 1800s. The wide border fabric was likely added much later, around 1880. In this quilt-making method, each little hexagon of fabric is basted around a paper template. These are whip-stitched together along all sides, the basting is taken out and the paper removed. Using a paper template in this manner allows for great precision and the use of such tiny hexagons (these are only ½” w). The careful placement of the colorful fabrics created this lovely star pattern using all one single shape – the hexagon. Many designs, from stars and diamonds to grandmother’s flower garden, can be created using this same shape. Hence, hexagon is truly the “eternal piece.”

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

The exhibition, Hexagon – eternal piece, part of the Tokyo International Great Quilt Festival 2012, contains four quilts from the Museum’s collection. On display form January 20 though January 28, these quilts will be seen by thousands of visitors from around the world.

This paper-template pieced quilt top was made by Elizabeth Docton Perry (born c. 1742) , wife of Ezekial Perry of Ridge Spring, SC probably in the early 1800s. The wide border fabric was likely added much later, around 1880. In this quilt-making method, each little hexagon of fabric is basted around a paper template. These are whip-stitched together along all sides, the basting is taken out and the paper removed. Using a paper template in this manner allows for great precision and the use of such tiny hexagons (these are only ½” w). The careful placement of the colorful fabrics created this lovely star pattern using all one single shape – the hexagon. Many designs, from stars and diamonds to grandmother’s flower garden, can be created using this same shape. Hence, hexagon is truly the “eternal piece.”

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday