Paper template pieced star quilt fragment, c. 1871. The shapes used for this quilt are unusual – a whole six-pointed star, diamonds and elongated hexagons. The paper template method allowed for precise fit and crisp points in this wool example. Note the interesting papers used as templates; one is dated 1871. That, along with the distinctive color combination, help date this fragment. It was a gift to the Museum in 1926 by Mrs. Harriette Kershaw Leiding and may have been made by her mother, Susan DeSaussure Kershaw, wife of Rev. John Kershaw, later rector at St. Michael’s Church.

This interesting pattern was actually published in Godey’s Lady’s Book, September 1854 on page 269. It instructed readers on paper-template piecing, fabric selection and finishing techniques.

Godey’s Lady’s Book was a magazine marketed specifically to women. Published by Louis A. Godey of Philadelphia from 1830 to 1878 (and after his death until 1898), the issues contained poetry, articles, engravings, sheet music, hand-tinted fashions and needlework crafts. Sarah Josepha Hale (author of Mary Had a Little Lamb) was its editor from 1837 until 1877. When she started, the magazine had a circulation of 10,000 subscribers; two years later it was 40,000 and by 1860 had 150,000 subscribers. Publication continued during the Civil War with little mention of war events or activities and it was extremely difficult to obtain copies in the South.

To learn more about mosaic patchwork quilts and even Marina Gregg, see our publication Mosaic Quilts: Paper Template Piecing in the Lowcountry.  Also, the Museum is offering a Traditional Mosaic Quilting Workshop on April 30, 2011.

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. Occasionally we’ll throw in a shameless commerce link, but only if we think it’s a good opportunity for you to learn more. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

A #TextileTuesday bonus! Curator video discussing knitted bags c.1812

Light blue satin shoes with silver braid, c. 1770. The label inside one shoe indicates that these were made in London by Thos. Hose, Shoemaker, Lombard Street. They belonged to Eliza Lucas Pinckney, who was married to Charles Pinckney, lawyer, judge and member of the House of Commons. Eliza is best known for her perseverance and success with her father’s indigo crop, ultimately making it a most prosperous crop in the Lowcountry (South Carolina) until the war. Her two sons were educated in London; both fought in the Revolutionary War. Charles Cotesworth was a member of the Provincial Congress and signer of the constitution; Thomas became governor of South Carolina. Her daughter Harriott married Daniel Horry of Hampton Plantation.
Gift of Mrs. William Wallace Childs through Mrs. St. Julian Ravenel Childs in 1948
TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

Light blue satin shoes with silver braid, c. 1770. The label inside one shoe indicates that these were made in London by Thos. Hose, Shoemaker, Lombard Street. They belonged to Eliza Lucas Pinckney, who was married to Charles Pinckney, lawyer, judge and member of the House of Commons. Eliza is best known for her perseverance and success with her father’s indigo crop, ultimately making it a most prosperous crop in the Lowcountry (South Carolina) until the war. Her two sons were educated in London; both fought in the Revolutionary War. Charles Cotesworth was a member of the Provincial Congress and signer of the constitution; Thomas became governor of South Carolina. Her daughter Harriott married Daniel Horry of Hampton Plantation.

Gift of Mrs. William Wallace Childs through Mrs. St. Julian Ravenel Childs in 1948

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

Mosaic patchwork quilt by Marina Jones Gregg, 1852, Charleston, SC. Made of silk fabrics, cotton batting and silk fringe. The quilt is 103 ½ inches long by 97 ½ inches wide. The hexagon templates are 1 3/8 inch.
This masterpiece is a pattern called Stars and Diamonds. The backing is composed of gold and yellow silks, which were pieced together. The mosaic patchwork is quilted inside each hexagon, 1/8 inch from the seam lines. The navy blue silk border is quilted in cable design; the quilting averages fourteen stitches to the inch. The Charleston Museum also has the brass template Marina used to make the paper templates. Marina Gregg received an award, a silver pitcher, for her efforts on this quilt.  
Marina was born in 1811 to Col. Mathias and Clara Perry Jones. She married William Gregg in 1829. William was a silversmith and jeweler and it is most likely that he made the brass templates for this quilt. The couple lived at 148 Rutledge Avenue in Charleston, then later in Graniteville,  SC, where William became a textile manufacturer. Marina died in 1899 and is buried in Magnolia  Cemetery.  
To learn more about mosaic patchwork quilts and even Marina Gregg, see our publication Mosaic Quilts: Paper Template Piecing in the Lowcountry. The Marina Gregg quilt graces the cover.
TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

Mosaic patchwork quilt by Marina Jones Gregg, 1852, Charleston, SC. Made of silk fabrics, cotton batting and silk fringe. The quilt is 103 ½ inches long by 97 ½ inches wide. The hexagon templates are 1 3/8 inch.

This masterpiece is a pattern called Stars and Diamonds. The backing is composed of gold and yellow silks, which were pieced together. The mosaic patchwork is quilted inside each hexagon, 1/8 inch from the seam lines. The navy blue silk border is quilted in cable design; the quilting averages fourteen stitches to the inch. The Charleston Museum also has the brass template Marina used to make the paper templates. Marina Gregg received an award, a silver pitcher, for her efforts on this quilt. 

Marina was born in 1811 to Col. Mathias and Clara Perry Jones. She married William Gregg in 1829. William was a silversmith and jeweler and it is most likely that he made the brass templates for this quilt. The couple lived at 148 Rutledge Avenue in Charleston, then later in Graniteville, SC, where William became a textile manufacturer. Marina died in 1899 and is buried in Magnolia Cemetery. 

To learn more about mosaic patchwork quilts and even Marina Gregg, see our publication Mosaic Quilts: Paper Template Piecing in the Lowcountry. The Marina Gregg quilt graces the cover.

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

The Charleston Museum is kicking off TEXTILE TUESDAYS today.  Each Tuesday we will post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display.  We hope you will enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY!Sack-back gown, Charleston, SCThis beautiful gown was worn by a member of the Middleton family in the 1750s or 1760s. It is a sack-back gown of ribbed silk brocade trimmed with elaborate fly-fringe. The matching petticoat is revealed by the open front design of the garment.  Note the stylish side bustles or panniers. These were at their widest in the 1740s. A triangular stomacher covers the lady’s stays (corset); she might have worn a matching one (like this reproduction), or chosen one of contrasting fabric. Donated to The Charleston Museum by Miss Alicia H. Middleton in 1937.  [1937.159.2]

The Charleston Museum is kicking off TEXTILE TUESDAYS today.  Each Tuesday we will post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display.  We hope you will enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY!

Sack-back gown, Charleston, SC
This beautiful gown was worn by a member of the Middleton family in the 1750s or 1760s. It is a sack-back gown of ribbed silk brocade trimmed with elaborate fly-fringe. The matching petticoat is revealed by the open front design of the garment.  Note the stylish side bustles or panniers. These were at their widest in the 1740s. A triangular stomacher covers the lady’s stays (corset); she might have worn a matching one (like this reproduction), or chosen one of contrasting fabric.

Donated to The Charleston Museum by Miss Alicia H. Middleton in 1937.  [1937.159.2]