Mosaic patchwork quilt by Marina Jones Gregg, 1852, Charleston, SC. Made of silk fabrics, cotton batting and silk fringe. The quilt is 103 ½ inches long by 97 ½ inches wide. The hexagon templates are 1 3/8 inch.
This masterpiece is a pattern called Stars and Diamonds. The backing is composed of gold and yellow silks, which were pieced together. The mosaic patchwork is quilted inside each hexagon, 1/8 inch from the seam lines. The navy blue silk border is quilted in cable design; the quilting averages fourteen stitches to the inch. The Charleston Museum also has the brass template Marina used to make the paper templates. Marina Gregg received an award, a silver pitcher, for her efforts on this quilt.  
Marina was born in 1811 to Col. Mathias and Clara Perry Jones. She married William Gregg in 1829. William was a silversmith and jeweler and it is most likely that he made the brass templates for this quilt. The couple lived at 148 Rutledge Avenue in Charleston, then later in Graniteville,  SC, where William became a textile manufacturer. Marina died in 1899 and is buried in Magnolia  Cemetery.  
To learn more about mosaic patchwork quilts and even Marina Gregg, see our publication Mosaic Quilts: Paper Template Piecing in the Lowcountry. The Marina Gregg quilt graces the cover.
TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

Mosaic patchwork quilt by Marina Jones Gregg, 1852, Charleston, SC. Made of silk fabrics, cotton batting and silk fringe. The quilt is 103 ½ inches long by 97 ½ inches wide. The hexagon templates are 1 3/8 inch.

This masterpiece is a pattern called Stars and Diamonds. The backing is composed of gold and yellow silks, which were pieced together. The mosaic patchwork is quilted inside each hexagon, 1/8 inch from the seam lines. The navy blue silk border is quilted in cable design; the quilting averages fourteen stitches to the inch. The Charleston Museum also has the brass template Marina used to make the paper templates. Marina Gregg received an award, a silver pitcher, for her efforts on this quilt. 

Marina was born in 1811 to Col. Mathias and Clara Perry Jones. She married William Gregg in 1829. William was a silversmith and jeweler and it is most likely that he made the brass templates for this quilt. The couple lived at 148 Rutledge Avenue in Charleston, then later in Graniteville, SC, where William became a textile manufacturer. Marina died in 1899 and is buried in Magnolia Cemetery. 

To learn more about mosaic patchwork quilts and even Marina Gregg, see our publication Mosaic Quilts: Paper Template Piecing in the Lowcountry. The Marina Gregg quilt graces the cover.

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from our textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our new Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday